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Seth Martin
seth@lastauth.com
Seth Martin
  
Since I know where most everyone who cares about Susie likes to waste their precious time, I took to #facebook to announce the tragic turn of events with her health.

Unfortunately, facebook functionality has only gotten worse. Copying text is no longer permitted, notifications come randomly and can take up to a day.
Techdirt.Techdirt. wrote the following post Thu, 26 Jan 2017 11:34:50 -0600

Legal Threats By Charles Harder & Shiva Ayyadurai Targeting More Speech

Let's say right upfront: if you are unaware, Shiva Ayyadurai is currently suing Techdirt for our posts concerning Ayyaduria's claims to have invented email. Ayyadurai's lawyer in this matter is Charles Harder, the lawyer who filed multiple lawsuits against Gawker, and is credited by many with forcing that company into bankruptcy and fire sale.

Now Harder, on behalf of Ayyadurai, has sent a demand letter to try to have social media comments posted in response to the lawsuit against us taken down. We are writing about this -- despite the lawsuit against us -- because we believe it is important and we do not intend to have our own speech chilled. This is also why we believe it is so important to have a federal anti-SLAPP law in place, because the chance to chill speech with threats or actual litigation is not a hypothetical problem. It is very, very real.

Harder's letter is to Diaspora, and it demands that certain posts by Roy Schestowitz be removed (which appears to have happened). Schestowitz is the guy behind the Techrights blog, which frequently covers issues related to things like free v. proprietary software and software patents. Harder's letter to Diaspora claims that Schestowitz's posts are defamatory, violate Diaspora's terms of service, and "constitute harassment and intentional infliction of emotional distress."

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Harder's letter makes the questionable claim that Diaspora itself is liable for Schestowitz's statements. There is tremendous caselaw on Section 230 of the CDA holding that a website cannot be held liable for speech made by users, so it's odd that Harder would argue otherwise, stating that the posts "qualify under the law to establish liability against you."

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One of the key reasons Section 230 of the CDA exists is to protect the freedom of expression of users, so that websites aren't pressured via legal threats to take down speech over fear of liability. That's why it grants full immunity. It is strange for an attorney as established as Harder to either not know this, or to misrepresent this. Elsewhere in the letter, he references Massachusetts law as applying, so it's not as though he's suggesting that some other jurisdiction outside the US applies. So, since Section 230 clearly applies, why would Charles Harder tell Diaspora that it is liable for these statements?

Separately, Harder's letter concludes with the following statement:

This letter and its contents are confidential, protected by copyright law, and not authorized for publication or dissemination.

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We have seen similar statements on legal letters in the past and they have generally been considered meaningless, at best. On the question of confidentiality/authorization for publication, that's not how it works. The recipient of such a letter has no obligation to not disseminate it or to ask for authorization without any prior agreement along those lines. You can't magically declare something confidential and ban anyone from sharing it. Furthermore, this is especially true when dealing with legal threat letters. While many lawyers put such language into these letters to try to scare recipients (and avoid a Streisand Effect over the attempt to silence speech), they serve no purpose other than intimidation.

Separately, claims of copyright in takedown or cease & desist letters, while they do show up occasionally, are also generally considered to be overstatements of the law. First off, there are questions raised about whether or not general cease & desist threat letters have enough creativity to get any kind of copyright, but, more importantly, even if there were copyright on such a letter it would be a clear and obvious fair use case to be able to share them and distribute them publicly, as part of an effort to discuss how one has been threatened with questionable legal arguments.

Either way, we believe that this fits a pattern of using legal threats and litigation to silence criticism of public figures. In an era when speaking truth to power is so important, we believe such actions need to be given attention, and need to be called out. We also think they demonstrate why we need much stronger anti-SLAPP laws, at both the state and federal level to protect people's right to speak out about public issues. If you agree, please call your elected representatives and ask them to support strong anti-SLAPP protections, like those found in the SPEAK FREE Act of 2015.

Permalink | Comments | Email This Story

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#Free Speech #Diaspora #Social Networking #Copyright #Defamation #Anti-SLAPP #Shiva Ayyadurai #Charles Harder #E-Mail @Gadget Guru+ @LibertyPod+
Seth Martin
  last edited: Tue, 11 Oct 2016 12:58:51 -0500  
We use #Hubzilla at my workplace so our data remains our data!
I'm also considering introducing the team to Riot/matrix for a Slack/IRC like experience.

MotherboardMotherboard wrote the following post Tue, 11 Oct 2016 11:45:00 -0500

Facebook's Version of Slack Is Coming for Your Workplace. What Now?

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Sitting at work all day scrolling through Facebook is almost definitely frowned upon by your bosses, but Facebook wants to change that with the launch of a new version of Facebook—specifically designed for work—called Workplace.

Facebook is ubiquitous. If it’s not Mark Zuckerberg handing out “Free Basics” to developing countries, it’s internet connectivity beamed down from giant, solar-powered drones. As of July 2016, the social network had 1.71 billion monthly users. Facebook is without doubt one of the most pervasive technological phenomenons of the 21st Century. Thing is, Facebook’s hit a brick wall when it comes to growth. Everybody who would want to use Facebook, generally speaking, is already, or at least will be using Facebook very soon. So, to eke out the last embers of growth in a saturated market, Facebook has now, officially, entered your workplace.

Workplace by Facebook launched on Monday October 10 after almost two years of development and months of beta tests on early customers. The service is the social giant’s new effort to infiltrate businesses around the world, and to rival office apps like Slack and Microsoft’s Yammer. Essentially, it’s a modified version of the Facebook we all know and love/hate. It’s the same algorithms, the same news feeds, the same ability to share photos and documents and chat in groups or in private—only your bosses can see everything that happens and it’s all controlled by your company’s IT team. Workplace is on mobile, too, with standalone apps for Android and iOS meaning employees can access everything remotely, just like users would with the regular Facebook app.

Facebook, with Workplace, is hoping to revolutionise how companies want to work with employees by shedding the old ideals of emails and intranet. “It's for everyone, not just for one team, not just for five percent of the company, it's for everyone from the CEO to the factory workers to the baristas in the coffee shop,” a Facebook spokesperson said at the London launch event this week, which Motherboard attended. “Even people who don't have a desk, even people who have never had a PC, even people who have never had an email.”

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Image: Workplace by Facebook

The question is, to what extent will this horizontal workflow management clash with privacy concerns? If your team or company decides to implement Workplace, will signing up be compulsory? It would seem so, if Facebook has its way and truly lets your bosses ditch emails and intranet and all of the inner workings of PC-based bureaucracy. But then what?

The Facebook spokesperson at the launch event said it best when he was explaining how the chief information officer of an airline wanted to be able to see what his staff were doing in their personal, consumer versions of Facebook groups. “Every crew of every flight were using Facebook groups,” the spokesperson said. “It's not necessarily what the CIO of the company wanted, because he wants to control who sees the information.”

But the reason why many organisations will be attracted to Workplace, such as the familiarity employees will have with regular old Facebook, could also be its downfall. Employees will be accustomed to Facebook being a place for gossip, cat videos, and friends. So what’s the decorum for Workplace by Facebook? While the two are completely different applications, old habits die hard. Who can you trust to speak to in private? Is my group being monitored for productivity? Do I have to befriend everyone in the company, and if I block someone’s news feed, will my boss know I hate them?
Your workplace chats may well one day be used as evidence against you

It’s also worth noting, as highlighted in the Gawker vs Hulk Hogan case, in which Gawker Media’s Slack conversations were subpoenaed for court, that your workplace chats may well one day be used as evidence against you. While data on Workplace belongs to the company using it, rather than Facebook, it’s still wise to watch what you say with any office productivity app. Facebook did not immediately respond to Motherboard’s request for comment on whether workplace chats would be susceptible to subpoenas.

Ultimately, Facebook is banking on the familiarity of the platform winning over customers. It’s appears easy to use and offers all of the same features as regular Facebook. But in the end, only time will tell whether employees will ever be, or ever want to be, comfortable using Facebook as a work tool or not.


#CCF #Facebook #Social Networking #Communications #Privacy @Gadget Guru+
Seth Martin
  last edited: Thu, 06 Oct 2016 18:29:43 -0500  
Facebook is getting the US government on its side before trying to launch its limited internet services in the US.

Facebook is talking to the White House about giving you ‘free’ Internet. Here’s why that may be controversial.

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The company has spent the past half-year in conversations with officials.

Facebook has been in talks for months with U.S. government officials and wireless carriers with an eye toward unveiling an American version of an app that has caused controversy abroad, according to multiple people familiar with the matter.

The social media giant is trying to determine how to roll out its program, known as Free Basics, in the United States without triggering the regulatory scrutiny that effectively killed a version of the app in India earlier this year.


#Facebook #Free Basics #FreeBasics #Internet #Corporatism #Crony Capitalism #Capitalism #Politics #Net Neutrality #NetNeutrality #Communications #Social Networking #Zero-Rating @LibertyPod+  @Laissez-Faire Capitalism+  @Gadget Guru+
Seth Martin
  last edited: Tue, 11 Oct 2016 13:07:51 -0500  
Mike MacgirvinMike Macgirvin wrote the following post Thu, 08 Sep 2016 04:16:36 -0500
If you know folks who use Facebook and 'logout' regularly to prevent tracking or prevent 'haha I hacked your FB account', I have it on good authority that in the last few days this (logout) has been rendered useless. You are now always logged in. Logging out and visiting a facebook page presents a dialogue to re-connect the last session. Dismissing the dialogue without acting on it actually re-connects the previous session with full access to the "logged out" account. My own investigation suggests that removing all facebook.com cookies might actually log you out, but if this information becomes widely known, they'll just attach a cookie from some obscure domain that you won't be looking for. It's not like they can't afford to buy a domain name.  

Granted there are probably less than a dozen people in the world who logout of Facebook, but if you know any of these people please pass the word along.


#Facebook #Privacy
LastAuth.com, libertypod.com, friendica.libertypod.com and gurus.red were all either not functioning or handicapped most of yesterday due to my hosting facility relocating the server. In hindsight, I should have accepted their offer to schedule a convenient time with me, but at that time I figured 'why not let them move it while I'm sleeping?'

There turned out to be more than one problem. First I didn't have any method set up to start the virtual machines automatically upon host machine reboot. I realized this when I woke, started them and rushed off to work. The next problem was that several database tables crashed for each website making them pretty useless.

It took a while to get all the tables repaired but it all looks good now.

My apologies to anyone that was inconvenienced.

#Fixed @LibertyPod+
Seth Martin
  
I understand that tag spamming is a problem with diaspora* but I'm a bit surprised at how hostile a few of the devs are being in regards to #multi word hashtags .

There are legitimate uses for multi word hashtags with whitespace, so it makes absolutely no sense to me why anyone would want to block another dev from adding functionality just because they don't want it. :facepalm

Improving and expanding hashtags usability.

#Diaspora #Drama
Seth Martin
  last edited: Wed, 15 Oct 2014 22:58:23 -0500  
Free Speech Gets Tricky When ISIS Shows Up

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Social networks struggle with open access as terrorists’ account proliferate


It looks like Adam Rawnsley didn't notice the #IS accounts on #diaspora before he finished the article.

#Friendica #RedMatrix #FreeSpeech #Freedom #Liberty #Social Networking #FOSS #FLOSS #Twitter #Social Media #ISIS #Terrorism @LibertyPod+
Seth Martin
  last edited: Sun, 03 Jul 2016 12:23:43 -0500  
The days of thriving Facebook pages are coming to an end quickly. If you run your own Facebook page you’ve already experienced this problem of reaching your own fans. These people who opted in and want to receive your updates won't ever see them now unless you pay money.

These two videos reveal the shadiness of what’s happening on Facebook right now. The videos explain why we often don't see each other’s posts, why all of our pages are filled with fake users, and how Facebook makes more money because of it.



Facebook Fraud
by Veritasium on YouTube



The Problem With Facebook
by 2veritasium on YouTube

The solution is of course to abandon the decrepit, privacy abusing, centralized walled gardens like Facebook. The free and open internet now has all of the social networking features of Facebook available without the problems and limits.

The most feature-rich option is the RedMatrix:

The RedMatrix is a decentralized network where the people using it are in charge and the size of your server farm and wealth do not offer any comparable advantage. Anybody may participate on a level playing field. Cloud storage, file sharing, communications, content creation and management belong to everybody and can be shared with anybody (or somebody, or nobody). This is only a representative sample of the services that the RedMatrix plans to offer. In an internet where creativity is allowed to flourish and corporate overlords have no power, the door is open to entirely new forms of expression and applications. The RedMatrix software is free and open source; created by volunteers and distributed under the MIT license.

And the RedMatrix has Got Zot.

So what the heck is Zot? I'm glad you asked...

Your identity is your own. One identity across the network.
Zot is a revolutionary protocol which provides decentralized communications and identity management across the matrix. The resulting platform can provide web services comparable to those offered by large corporate providers, but without the large corporate provider and their associated privacy issues. Communications and social networking are an integral part of the matrix. Any channel (and any services provided by that channel) can make full use of feature-rich social communications on a global scale.

We use the full power of the matrix to offer friend suggestions and directory services. You can also perform other things which would typically only be possibly on a centralized provider - such as "wall to wall" posts and private/multiple profiles and web content which can be tailored to the viewer. You won't find these features at all on other decentralized communication services. The difference is that Zot also provides decentralized identity services. This is what separates the men from the boys, and what makes life in the matrix so awesome.

Zot's identity layer is unique. It's like OpenID on steroids. It provides invisible single sign-on across all sites in the matrix; as well as nomadic identity so that your communications with friends, family, and business partners won't be affected by the loss of your primary communication node - either temporarily or permanently. The important bits of your identity and relationships can be backed up to a thumb drive and may appear at any node in the matrix at any time - with all your friends and preferences intact. These nomadic instances are kept in sync so any instance can take over if another one is compromised or damaged. This protects you against not only major system failure, but also temporary site overloads and governmental manipulation. You cannot be silenced. You cannot be removed from the matrix.

As you browse the matrix viewing channels and their unique content, you are seamlessly authenticated as you go, even across completely different server hubs. No password dialogues. Nothing to type. You're just greeted by name on every new site you visit. How does Zot do that? We call it "magic-auth" because it really is technology that is so advanced as to be indistinguishable from magic. You login only once on your home hub (or any nomadic backup hub you have chosen). This allows you to access any authenticated services provided anywhere in the matrix - such as shopping and access to private information. This is just like the services offered by large corporate providers with huge user databases; however you can be a member of this community and a server on this network using a "plug computer" like a Rasberry Pi. Your password isn't stored on a thousand different sites where it can be stolen and used to clean out your bank accounts.

You control your data. RedMatrix enforces your permissions.
Zot's identity layer allows you to provide fine-grained permissions to any content you wish to publish - and these permissions extend across the RedMatrix. This is like having one super huge website made up of an army of small individual websites - and where each channel in the matrix can completely control their privacy and sharing preferences for any web resources they create.

Example: you want a photo to be visible to your family and three select friends, but not your work colleagues. In the matrix this is easy. Even if your family members, work colleagues, and friends all have accounts on different hubs.

Currently the matrix supports communications, photo albums, events, files, chat rooms, content management services (web pages) and WebDAV cloud storage facilities. Every object and how it is shared and with whom is completely under your control.

Again, this type of control is available on large corporate providers, because they own the user database. Within the matrix, there is no need for a huge user database on your machine - because the matrix is your user database and for all intents and purposes has infinite capacity and is spread amongst hundreds, and potentially millions of computers. Access can be granted or denied for any resource, to any channel or any group of channels; anywhere within the matrix. They do not need to have an account on your hub.

Reclaim your privacy. RedMatrix is built for you, not governments and corporations.
Your communications may be public or private - and we allow your private communications to be as private as you wish them to be. Private communications comprise not only fully encrypted transport, but also encrypted storage to help protect against accidental snooping and disclosure by rogue system administrators and internet service providers.

Want more? You can fully encrypt your messages "end to end" using your choice of encryption ciphers and using a passphrase that only you and the recipient(s) know - in addition to our standard multi-layer encryption.

Want more? Our end to end encryption is pluggable. You can define your own chain of multiple encryption steps with multiple keys, and include algorithms known only to you and the recipient. At some point even the US National Security Agency will have to throw up their hands. There won't be enough computational power available in the universe to decode your private message.

We also provide optional message expiration as a standard feature. When the expiration date/time passes, your message is removed from the network.


Another great decentralized option is a social network called Friendica, which was created by the same developers prior to the RedMatrix but has less features and is often used because people are familiar with the simple social network permissions. Friendica also federates with other decentralized social networks like diaspora*.

#Facebook #Fraud #Social Networking #Decentralization #Open-Source #Communication #Friendica #RedMatrix #CMS #WebDAV #Zot #GotZot? #GetZot @LibertyPod+  @Laissez-Faire Capitalism+